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Ahzryn Briar Rose Blanket

tunisian blanket squares

I came across photos of a baby blanket that I fell in love with, but couldn’t find a pattern. I decided to recreate what I saw, hoping it would come out right. I was very pleased with my result, which was quite different in execution. My version is here

I teach crochet, and my ladies asked to make the blanket. I decided to find the designer. I placed posts on a fb pages I belong to. The result was amazing! I found her! And many, many hookers asked for a pattern. Tammy only had a brief explanation on her Ravelry project, and I got requests for a proper pattern over and over. Tammy asked that I write the pattern as she didn’t know how to, so I did.

I decided to add a project to Ravelry, linking to her original project. Here it is:

Briar Rose Afghan

Original made by: Tammy Nanda: http://www.ravelry.com/projects/ahzryn/celtic-lace-join

Pattern details updated by: Charlene Boardman aka CraftCrazyGran: http://www.ravelry.com/projects/caboardman/ahzryn-briar-rose-blanket

US terms

These are not my photos, but of the original made by Ahzryn

Materials:

I used Kismet Lollipop Double Knit which come in 300m/100g balls
400g Medium (4), Worsted Weight, DK yarn White or Cream
300g Medium (4), Worsted Weight, DK yarn Light Pink
300g Medium (4), Worsted Weight, DK yarn Medium Pink
300g Medium (4), Worsted Weight, DK yarn Dark Pink
300g Medium (4), Worsted Weight, DK yarn Light Green
5mm hook

 Gingham squares:

  • 13237813_1178111732213108_5549304237590793884_nA: dark pink blocks in the corners
    Gingham squares are 20sc x 20 rows, changing colours after 4sc/rows. Carry your yarn behind your work when not in use. If you prefer, you can crochet over the yarn too.
  1. Holding dark and medium pink yarns together, and carrying yarn behind your work loosely, chain 4 in dark pink, change to medium chain 4, dark pink ch 4, medium pink ch 4, dark pink ch 5 (last being your turning ch) (5 blocks of colour)
  2. Sc in each st using colour of chains. (4sc in dark, 4sc in medium)
  1. And 4. Repeat row 2

5 – 8. Change colours to medium and light pink for the next 4 rows. 4sc in medium, 4sc in light, to end

9 – 12. Change colours to dark and medium pink again. 4sc in dark, 4sc in medium to end

13 – 16. Repeat rows 5-8

17 – 20. Repeat rows 13-16

You will now have a gingham-like block of dark, medium and light pink – 20ch (plus 1 turning chain) and 20 rows.

Border:

  1. Begin in corner with a standing dc: Corners:  (2dc, ch3, 2dc) *(Dc in next st, ch3, dc into same st, skip 2 st* repeat 3x, dc into next st.  Repeat for each side, end with ss into top of 1st st dc in corner
  2. Slip stitch into corner ch3, begin with 3ch for 1st Corners: *(3dc, ch3, 3dc). *5dc into ch3* repeat  4x. Make corner.* Repeat for each side, ending with invisible join or ss into top of ch3,  Fasten off.

B: light pink blocks in the corners

13173929_1178111762213105_713100111989843581_nGingham squares are 20sc x 20 rows, changing colours after 4sc/rows. Carry your yarn behind your work when not in use. If you prefer, you can crochet over the yarn too.

  1. Holding Light and medium pink yarns together, and carrying yarn behind your work loosely, chain 4 in light pink, change to medium chain 4, light pink ch 4, medium pink ch 4, light pink ch 5 (last being your turning ch) (5 blocks of colour)
  1. Sc in each st using colour of chains. (4sc in light, 4sc in medium, repeat)
  1. And 4. Repeat row 2

5 – 8. Change colours to medium and dark pink for the next 4 rows. 4sc in medium, 4sc in dark, to end

9 – 12. Change colours to light and medium pink again. 4sc in light, 4sc in medium to end

13 – 16. Repeat rows 5-8

17 – 20. Repeat rows 13-16

You will now have a gingham-like block of dark, medium and light pink – 20ch (plus 1 turning chain) and 20 rows.

Border:

  1. Begin in corner with a standing dc: Corners:  (2dc, ch3, 2dc) *(Dc in next st, ch3, dc into same st, skip 2 st* repeat 3x, dc into next st.  Repeat for each side, end with ss into top of 1st st dc in corner
  2. Slip stitch into corner ch3, begin with 3ch for 1st Corners: *(3dc, ch3, 3dc). *5dc into ch3* repeat  4x. Make corner.* Repeat for each side, ending with invisible join or ss into top of ch3,  Fasten off.
  • Flower Squares:

    13177632_1178111742213107_3503605362019220005_n

Babouska Rosehttps://thelittletreasures.blogspot.co.za/search/label/babouska%20rose

  • Border:
    1. Begin in corner with a standing dc: Corners:  (2dc, ch3, 2dc) *(Dc in next st, ch3, dc into same st, skip 2 st* repeat 3x, dc into next st.  Repeat for each side, end with ss into top of 1st st dc in corner
    2. Slip stitch into corner ch3, begin with 3ch for 1st Corners: *(3dc, ch3, 3dc). *5dc into ch3* repeat  4x. Make corner.* Repeat for each side, ending with invisible join or ss into top of ch3,  Fasten off.

     

  • Join: Celtic Lace Join: FREE PATTERN  http://babylovebrand.net/2013/11/20/celtic-lace-join/Join
  • Outside Border:
    Outside Border
    (sc, ch2, 2dc, picot, 2dc, ch2) around, with corners worked with 3dc, 3 picot.
  • NB: pattern is not tested. Please contact me if you find errors, on here or: ca.boardman@gmail.com
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A new treasure unveiled in Kruger; the Pafuri Border Camp

This is fantastic news! I’d love to go up for a visit, it’s been ages since we were in the Park! What a wonderful article and gorgeous photos!

de Wets Wild

An omnipresent sense of history permeates the grounds and buildings of Pafuri Border Camp, with the call of a wild frontier on your doorstep clarion clear and impossible to refuse.

Here at Pafuri in the Far North of the Kruger National Park, Harold and Tiny Mockford built their lives, raised a family, grew old. From 1938 to 1985, Mockford was the recruiting agent and administrative officer at the labour recruitment station established at Pafuri by the Witwatersrand Native Labour Association (WNLA, colloquially simply “Wenela”, later TEBA – The Employment Bureau of Africa) to provide migrant workers for the mushrooming gold mines at Johannesburg.

Comprising the beautifully restored and period-furnished residences inhabited by the Mockfords and other WNLA / TEBA staff, the Pafuri Border Camp will offer overnight accommodation in three very spacious self-catering units: the one-bedroom (4-sleeper) Mockford Cottage, the three-bedroom (6-sleeper) Doctor’s House, and the four-bedroom (8-sleeper) Mockford House. Relaxing on the wide verandas that wrap around the houses, enclosed…

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Last of the Summer Fun

I adore Alpacas, and loved this post!

Moji-Moji Design

Another busy week has flown past. We’ve indulged in a bit of travelling and some mini breaks to squeeze the last few bits of fun out of the summer while all the boys were still together. This has resulted in plenty of car time for a spot of crocheting and sightseeing all rolled up into one. One of my favorite trips was to Weston-Super-Mare to see Banksy’s Dismaland art exhibition.

bb5

As you can see, the weather was just gorgeous so some of the deliberate dismalness was mitigated somewhat!

bb3

Here are a few snippets of some of the weird and wonderful stuff going on.

The best £5 I’ve ever spent, value for money and thought provoking. Great fun!

I love to go to Weston for a day trip as it’s the most easily accessible seaside town from where we live, so this just added an extra kick to the day. Fish and chips on the beach and a spot of…

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Monster Bean Bag Toss Game DIY

I made a Bean Bag Toss board and bags for my Grandsons for Christmas.

The board is made from Medium Density Fibre-board (MDF)
Mine is about twice as long as wide.
The dimensions are as you like.

DSC_2364

I drew a monster face, with a big mouth to toss the bags through.
The mouth should be in the top half of the board.
I added felt “teeth” at the back of the board.
Use acrylic paints to make your monster colourful, and remember,
little kids prefer a friendlier monster!

DSC_2359

The Bean Bag Monsters were just free-hand shapes
cut our of various brightly coloured and patterned fabrics.
I added eyes and mouths, out of fleece and felt
and appendages as I liked.
Then stuffed them with polyester stuffing and sewed closed.
Just be sure they all fit through the mouth hole!

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Kharma Chameleon

I love chameleons. From their “um, yes I’ll go, ummm, hang on, maybe I’ll stay, No, hang on, don’t rush me, I’ll go!” – to their awesomely yucky, loooonnnngggg, sticky tongue and deadly aim! Their curly tails and cute split foot, with toes on either side! Their googly eyes and various appellations. They’re fabulously talented camouflage experts and when they get cross!!!! Oooh, you really do know it from their colouration! We found this one hanging out in the garden. He had a white patch of “lichen” on his head that was rather rakish! We’ve spotted him a few times in the garden and watch him watching us, as well as everything else!!! They are awesome!

Big G was so excited, but reluctant to take him. He thrilled to watch him wobble over Little K. Little K of course just wanted to grab and eat poor Boy George (of course).

Please don’t try to keep a chameleon – they have an enormously varied and voracious diet and do not do well in captivity.

Chameleons are from a family called Chamaeleonidae, and are very different to other lizards!

  • They have feet like a parrot – called zygodactylous feet. It means that they have two toes pointing forward, and two toes pointing backwards.
  • Their eyes are able to move independently, called stereoscopic eyes.
  • They have very special tongues; very long, highly modified and rapidly extrudable (stretchy) tongues.
  • They walk funny – back and forth swaying motion.
  • Many chameleons have a prehensile tail – like a monkey.
  • Some have crests or horns on their prehistoric looking heads.
  • They’re mainly known for being able to change colour, but not all do.
  • They come in all sorts of sizes; from littlies measuring about 16mm  or (1/2 in.) in Brookesia micra  (one of the world’s smallest reptiles) to 68.5 cm (27 in.) in the male Furcifer oustaleti.
  • There are approximately 160 species of chameleon in the world; from Africa, Madagascar,  Spain and Portugal, across south Asia to Sri Lanka. They have been introduced to Hawaii, California and Florida. They like warm places that can be as different as deserts to rain forests!

The word chameleon comes originally from Greek and sort of means “ground lion”.

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